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Course Descriptions

ACCREDITED BY ACBSP
Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs

School of Business

study

ACCOUNTING COURSES

ACCOUNTING I (ACCT 215)

3 sem. hrs.

Emphasis is placed on the main aspects of the accounting structure. The fundamental accounting principle is presented in the form of the balance sheet equation. This is followed by the logical development of the subject debits and credits, the special journals, specific account classifications, and control mechanisms of various types.

ACCOUNTING II (ACCT 220)

3 sem. hrs.

Focus is on the application of accounting principles inside the enterprise, i.e., the proprietorship, the partnership, and the corporation. Prerequisite: ACCT215.

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (ACCT 315)

3 sem. hrs.

An intensive study of accounting principles, conventions, and rules. Cost and revenue concepts are stressed. Topics: working papers, financial statements, partnerships, corporations, interest and annuities, and cost concepts. Prerequisite: ACCT220.

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (ACCT 320)

3 sem. hrs.

A continuation of ACCT 310. Topics: valuation of cast, receivables, inventories, tangible fixed assets, intangible assets, and investments. Topics also include funds and reserves, corporation financial statements and analyses of working capital, profits and funds flows. Prerequisite: ACCT315.

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (ACCT 325)

3 sem. hrs.

Development of accounting information for business management. Topics: cost systems, materials control, labor cost control, manufacturing expense and allocation, job cost accounting, process cost accounting, costing by-products and joint products, budgets, standard costs, and uses of cost data. Prerequisite: ACCT220.

FEDERAL INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAXATION (ACCT 330)

3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the law of federal income taxation and offers theoretical understanding of the underpinnings of the United States' major tax law, as well as a practical understanding of the administration of that law. Prerequisite: ACCT220.

TAX ACCOUNTING - ADVANCED TOPICS (ACCT 335)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces tax research and discusses federal income tax treatment of corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. The principal concerns of the course are tax practice and planning. Prerequisite: ACCT220.

AUDITING I (ACCT 400)

3 sem hrs.

This course discusses the purposes and organization of financial audits, including the use of studies to evaluate internal control mechanisms and procedures. Topics include preparation of audit programs for all financial accounts and preparation of auditing work papers. Emphasis is on generally accepted auditing standards. Prerequisite: ACCT320.

AUDITING II (ACCT 405)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents the methodology and purpose of independent auditing; these include the nature and amount of audit evidence necessary for preparing audit reports. It also discusses the auditor's professional liability, ethics, independence, and responsibilities as well as specific methods of review and evaluation related to internal control. Other topics include management advisory services and compiled and reviewed financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT400.

ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (ACCT 420)

3 sem. hrs.

A course designed for students who are training to become professional accountants, either public or private. Topics: Specialized accounting problems such as agency and branch accounting, joint ventures, corporate combinations, consolidations and mergers, consolidated financial statements, and specialized accounting systems. Prerequisite: ACCT320.

FORENSIC ACCOUNTING (ACCT 430)

3 sem. hrs.

This course instructs students the basic principles of forensic accounting including the history of investigative accounting and the qualifications of investigators. Students will study fraudulent financial reporting, misappropriation of assets, indirect methods of misappropriating income, money laundering and cash flows, evidence management, loss valuations, and providing litigation support and testimony. Prerequisite: ACCT400.

INDEPENDENT STUDY: ACCOUNTING (ACCT 490)

Variable Credit

The Independent Study program aims to serve those students whose scholarly bent seems most clearly adapted to independent work. Students are permitted to resolve problems and to earn credit for work performed outside the classroom requirement of any specific course in the curriculum.

INTERNSHIP IN ACCOUNTING (ACCT 495)

3 - 15 sem. hrs.

The accounting internship provides students with an on-the-job learning experience in a public accounting firm or in the accounting functions of a commercial firm, government agency, or institution. Interns have an opportunity to apply classroom learning in a practical work environment. Accounting interns must have earned 60 credits, with at least 15 of those credits taken at Edinboro University, and including a minimum of 9 credits in the Accounting Requirements section (Section III) of the Business Administration - Accounting or Accounting/Forensic Accounting Curriculum Requirements. A minimum 2.6 grade point average in his/her major and a 2.4 grade point average overall is required. Application approval will be in accordance with University policy.

FUND ACCOUNTING (ACCT 610)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents the special accounting procedures that are used by governments, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit organizations. Topics include the accounting for governmental-type funds, proprietary funds, and the self-balancing account groups. Computing software is employed in fund accounting applications and analyses. Prerequisite: ACCT220.

TAX POLICY AND RESEARCH (ACCT 620)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents the special accounting procedures that are used by governments, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit organizations. Topics include the accounting for governmental-type funds, proprietary funds, and the self-balancing account groups. Computing software is employed in fund accounting applications and analyses. Prerequisite: ACCT220.

ADVANCED MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (ACCT 630)

3 sem. hrs.

This course examines accounting information utilized by management for planning, control, motivation, internal reporting, and evaluation. Advanced concepts studied include activity based management, product pricing, inventory management, capital budgeting, and responsibility accounting. Managerial accounting practices of manufacturing, merchandising, and service firms in the commercial and not-for-profit sectors are studied in both domestic and multinational settings. Prerequisite: ACCT325.

PROFESSIONAL AUDITING PRACTICE (ACCT 640)

3 sem. hrs.

This course is a study of the purposes of auditing and the practical applications of generally accepted auditing standards. Specific topics include the audit of business operating cycles and computerized accounting systems, the development of electronic audit work papers, and the writing of audit reports. Prerequisite: ACCT400.



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES

BUSINESS PRIMER (BUAD 000)

0 sem. hrs.

Incoming freshmen in Business and Economics take this non-credit (and no tuition!) session in both the fall and spring semesters of their first year. This sessions cover topics of importance to freshmen and offer suggestions for success as a department major. Freshmen learn the "ropes" of being a successful student from how to use the Internet for business research to graduation requirements to how to pre-register for each semester. This sessions are taught by the Department's Freshmen Academic Advisor, Professor Asri Jantan.

INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (BUAD 320)

3 sem. hrs.

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the principles of information resource management and related business information system applications and issues. A managerial approach familiarizes students with organizational applications in accounting, finance, operations, marketing and other specialized areas in business. Students will also use the personal productivity tools, Excel, Word, Power Point and Access, to solve business problems. Prerequisites: MGMT300 and CSCI104.

BUSINESS LAW I (BUAD 260)

3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the legal environment manager's face with attention to the sources of law and the arenas of dispute resolution, as well as to the relationship between law and ethics. Studies include the substantive areas of the law most important to the manager: contracts, torts, agency, governmental regulation of trade and the environment. Prerequisite: ECON220 or permission of the instructor.

BUSINESS LAW II (BUAD 365)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents in-depth business law topics on business organizations, negotiable instruments, credit transactions, bankruptcy, estates, and trusts. It reviews the professional and ethical responsibility of professionals, including CPAs and CFPs. Prerequisite: BUAD260 or permission of the instructor.

LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (BUAD 410)

3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the legal environment of international business in an increasingly interdependent world and studies the major forms of conducting global business. It also surveys those laws of the United States which affect the multinational company. Prerequisites: BUAD260 or BUAD365 or permission of the instructor.

BUSINESS DECISION MAKING (BUAD 475)

3 sem. hrs.

All managers, regardless of the level in an organization, need to make decisions. To develop skills in applying decision concepts, the course involves the study of both theoretical and practical approaches to decision making, and examination of the many factors that must be considered. It integrates the decision sciences into an overall methodology for policy making applicable to business problems utilizes cases involving production, pricing, capital investments and their interaction with other factors. Prerequisites: BUAD320, FIN300, MGMT300, MKTG300, PHIL260, QUAN340, at least two (2) department course numbered 310 or higher, and senior standing.

INDEPENDENT STUDY: BUSINESS (BUAD 490)

Variable Credit

The Independent Study program aims to serve those students whose scholarly bent seems most clearly adapted to independent work. Students are permitted to resolve problems and to earn credit for work performed outside the classroom requirement of any specific course in the curriculum.

INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS (BUAD 495)

3-15 sem. hrs.

The business internship provides students with an on-the-job learning experience in a commercial firm, government agency, or institution. Interns have an opportunity to apply classroom learning in a practical work environment. Business interns must have earned 60 credits, with at least 15 of those credits taken at Edinboro University, and including a minimum of 9 credits in Section III of the Business Administration concentration's Curriculum Requirements. A minimum 2.6 grade point average in his/her major and a 2.4 grade point average overall is required. Application approval will be in accordance with University policy.

THE ECONOMICS OF MARKETS AND ENTERPRISE FINANCE (BUAD 640)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents those elements of economic and financial theory and those characteristics of the economic environment, which are necessary to an understanding of enterprise decision making. The role of the external economic environment and that of the financial function within the enterprise are emphasized. Those topics, which are of particular relevance to information technology, are emphasized. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students admitted in the MS in Information Technology. Prerequisites: knowledge of principles of financial accounting and microeconomics.

ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING (BUAD 645)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents established management and marketing theory and practice utilized in successful enterprise decision making. Topics which are of particular relevance to the management of information technology are emphasized. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students admitted in the MS in Information Technology. Prerequisites: knowledge of principles of financial accounting and microeconomics.

E-COMMERCE (BUAD 675)

3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the current business and technical issues of electronic commerce. Focus is on the motivation for and structure of the electronic commerce environments. Critical success factors, both economic and technical, are explored as well as legal and ethical issues. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students admitted in the MS in Information Technology. Design and deployment challenges are investigated. Prerequisites: IT660, BUAD640, BUAD645.



BUSINESS LAW COURSES

BUSINESS LAW I (BUAD 260)

3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the legal environment manager's face with attention to the sources of law and the arenas of dispute resolution, as well as to the relationship between law and ethics. Studies include the substantive areas of the law most important to the manager: contracts, torts, agency, governmental regulation of trade and the environment. Prerequisite: ECON220 or permission of the instructor.

BUSINESS LAW II (BUAD 365)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents in-depth business law topics on business organizations, negotiable instruments, credit transactions, bankruptcy, estates, and trusts. It reviews the professional and ethical responsibility of professionals, including CPAs and CFPs. Prerequisite: BUAD260 or permission of the instructor.

LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (BUAD 410)

3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the legal environment of international business in an increasingly interdependent world and studies the major forms of conducting global business. It also surveys those laws of the United States which affect the multinational company. Prerequisites: BUAD360 or BUAD365 or permission of the instructor.



ECONOMICS COURSES

ELEMENTS OF ECONOMICS (ECON 100)

3 sem. hrs.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental methods and concepts of economics. It includes basic elements of macro, micro, and international economics and emphasizes the application of economic analysis to relevant issues. This course is not a substitute for ECON215 or ECON220 and may not be taken by students who already have taken either ECON215 or ECON220. This course is approved for General Education-Core 3.

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS: MACROECONOMICS (ECON 225)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents the foundation of economic analysis of the macroeconomy. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of economic theory and its application for policy in the aggregate economy. Sufficient depth of material is presented for a general understanding of economic systems, national income accounting, the business cycle, government economic policy, and the monetary sector of the economy. This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 2.

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS: MICROECONOMICS (ECON 220)

3 sem. hrs.

A study of demand and supply, pricing in product and resource markets - pure and imperfect competition; examination of current economic problems; the fundamentals of international economics; the problems of underdeveloped countries; comparative economic systems. This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 2.

PERSONAL ECONOMICS (ECON 301)

3 sem. hrs.

This course provides the fundamentals of personal economic and financial management. It emphasizes information and techniques useful in the management of individual or family economic concerns. Sample topics include budgeting, credit management, home purchasing, taxes, and investments. This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 2.

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (ECON 310)

3 sem. hrs.

The objective of the course is to study the economic basis for trade among nations, commercial policy, and international finance. The role and mechanism of international trade, trade barriers (tariffs and other interferences), the effect on the economies, exchange rate, balance of payments disturbances, international capital flows and the institutions designed to facilitate international trade are examined. Prerequisite: ECON220.

INTERMEDIATE ECONOMIC THEORY: MACRO (ECON 319)

3 sem. hrs.

This course analyses theory and policy with emphasis upon the presentation, in a clear and systematic form, theories concerning the levels of income and employment, the rate of economic growth, and the general price level. Prerequisite: ECON220.

INTERMEDIATE ECONOMIC THEORY: MICRO (ECON 320)

3 sem. hrs.

This course studies intensively the theory of value and distribution using partial and general equilibrium techniques of analysis. Topics include the theory of demand, cost and production theory, pricing in various market structures, and the theory of factor markets. Prerequisite: ECON220.

BUSINESS, GOVERNMENT & PUBLIC POLICY (ECON 325)

3 sem. hrs.

This course deals with the relationship between governments and firms in a market economy and studies current laws and regulations with basic principles of public policy formulation. Topics include the rationale for public economic policy, antitrust, industrial regulation, and environmental regulations. Prerequisite: ECON220.

LABOR ECONOMICS (ECON 330)

3 sem. hrs.

This course in applied micro- and macro-economic theory deals with the general question of resource allocation and the determination of prices and levels of production in the economy. It focuses on the organization, functioning and outcomes of labor markets, the decision of labor market participants, and public policies related to labor resources. Prerequisite: ECON220.

HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (ECON 335)

3 sem. hrs.

This course analyzes the major contributions to economics such as the theories of Mercantilism, Physiocracy, Classical Economists, Neoclassical Economists, Marginalists, Institutional Economists, Monetary Economists and Contemporary Economists. Prerequisite: ECON220.

MONEY & BANKING (ECON 345)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the banking system and the role of money in a market economy. The course deals with the nature of money, the commercial banking system, financial markets, the Federal Reserve System, monetary theory and policy, and the international monetary system. Prerequisite: ECON220.

ECONOMIC GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT (ECON 355)

3 sem. hrs.

This course studies some of the theories, evidence, and policies of economic growth and development. Topics include review of theories from the Mercantilists to contemporary development theories; growth and development in the U.S., Western Europe and newly industrialized countries; and developing countries' policies, problems, and prospects. Prerequisite: ECON220.

ENERGY ECONOMICS & POLICY (ECON 365)

3 sem. hrs.

The primary purpose of this course is to instruct students in the economic aspects of energy issues. Established techniques of microeconomics will be applied to analyze energy resources as scarce inputs in production, studied and evaluated with regard to economic efficiency. Prerequisite: ECON220 or permission of the instructor.

CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC PROBLEMS (ECON 370)

3 sem. hrs.

This course studies some of the most significant contemporary economic questions facing the American people. Examples of such topics include: the role of government in the economy, inflation and deflation, balance of international payments, federal budget deficits, environmental economic issues, and the economics of health care. Students who successfully complete ECON251 may not register for this course. Prerequisite: ECON100 or ECON215. This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 2.

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (ECON 380)

3 sem. hrs.

The application of economic analysis to the formulation and solutions of business problems in the areas of decision making and planning. Topics discussed include: demand analysis, forecasting, production, capital budgeting, capital investment, competition, cost, pricing, and profits. Prerequisite: ECON220.

ECONOMIC FORECASTING (ECON 410)

3 sem. hrs.

The application of economic relavant theory, statistical and other quantitative techniques, and appropriate sources of data. Prerequisite: ECON220 and QUAN340.

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ECONOMICS (ECON 490)

1-3 sem. hrs.

Individual readings in a specified area of economics, and/or the completion of a research project under the guidance of a faculty member.

INTERNSHIP IN ECONOMICS (ECON 495)

3-15 sem. hrs.

The economics internship provides students with an on-the-job learning experience in a commercial firm, government agency, or institution. Interns have an opportunity to apply classroom learning in a practical work environment. Economics interns must have earned 60 credits, with at least 15 of those credits taken at Edinboro University, and including a minimum of 9 credits in upper-level (300 or above) Economics Electives courses (Section II.B of the Curriculum Requirements). A minimum 2.6 grade point average in his/her major and a 2.4 grade point average overall is required. Application approval will be in accordance with University policy.

PUBLIC FINANCE (ECON 508/POLI 508)

3 sem. hrs.

This course consists of the study of the public economy at the national, state, and local levels. It will analyze the role of government in attaining an efficient allocation of resources and an equitable distribution of income. Topics will include taxation, government expenditure, public debt, pricing of government services, international fiscal relations, and the role of government in a market economy. Prerequisite: ECON220.

SEMINAR ON EUROPEAN ECONOMY (ECON 550)

3 sem. hrs.

This course deals with currently developing economic issues in Europe related to economic growth, relationship between western and eastern European blocks, economic integration and its impact on the world economy. Prerequisite: ECON220 or equivalent background.



FINANCE COURSES

MONEY & BANKING (ECON 345)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the banking system and the role of money in a market economy. The course deals with the nature of money, the commercial banking system, financial markets, the Federal Reserve System, monetary theory and policy, and the international monetary system. Prerequisite: ECON220.
This course may be used to meet the requirement for an upper-level (≥ 310) finance course.

PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (FIN 300)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and theoretical tools of financial analysis. It examines the selected problems and issues in the field of finance, such as business objectives; use of financial statements and ratios as control devices; uses and sources of business funds flows; working capital management and capital budgeting. Case studies are utilized in order to ensure the student's understanding. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON215, CSCI102 or CSCI104 (or equivalent experience), MATH105 (or higher mathematics course).

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (FIN 310)

3 sem. hrs.

The course explores the characteristics of international financial markets and the associated risks and benefits. It studies the balance of payments adjustment mechanism, the international monetary system, foreign exchange markets, and international aspects of corporate financial management in a global economic environment. The role of international reserves, adjustment under fixed and flexible exchange rates, and use of exchange controls are also examined. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON215 and FIN300.

BUSINESS FINANCE (FIN 320)

3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on long-term financing strategies of the corporation. The theory of valuation for corporate securities, capital structure theory and policy, dividend theory and policy, and the overall cost of capital to the business firm are examined. Prerequisite: FIN300.

PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING (FIN 360)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the personal financial planning process and the professional services environment that promotes and implements personal financial plans and products. Topics include personal financial data gathering, establishing personal goals and objectives, risk management and insurance products, investment strategies, income tax planning, retirement planning, and estate and gift planning. The preparation of formal personal financial plans is also included. Prerequisite: FIN300.

FINANCIAL INVESTMENT ANALYSIS (FIN 400)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the investment environment and process. The investment environment describes investment securities and their purchase and sale. The investment process describes the decision-making procedure of acquiring and disposing of securities in competitive financial markets. It examines the relationship of risk and expected reward in light of rigid investment goals. Prerequisites: FIN300 and QUAN340.

RETIREMENT, ESTATE, AND RISK MANAGEMENT PLANNING (FIN 420)

3 sem. hrs.

This course takes an in-depth look at strategies for retirement planning, asset transfer planning, and managing risk. Topics include pension plans, social security, investments for retirement needs, estate tax, gift tax, probate, trusts, gifts, life insurance, property insurance, health insurance, disability insurance, and non-insurance risk management strategies. Prerequisite: FIN360 or permission of the instructor.

INTERNSHIP IN FINANCIAL SERVICES (FIN 495)

3-15 sem. hrs.

The financial services internship provides students with an on-the-job learning experience in a commercial firm, government agency, or institution. Interns have an opportunity to apply classroom learning in a practical work environment. Financial Services interns must have earned 60 credits, with at least 15 of those credits taken at Edinboro University, and including a minimum of 9 credits in the Financial Services Requirements section (Section III) of the Business Administration - Financial Services Curriculum Requirements. A minimum 2.6 grade point average in his/her major and a 2.4 grade point average overall is required. Application approval will be in accordance with University policy.



FINANCIAL SERVICES COURSES

FEDERAL INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAXATION (ACCT 330)

3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the law of federal income taxation and offers theoretical understanding of the underpinnings of the United States' major tax law, as well as a practical understanding of the administration of that law. Prerequisite: ACCT220.

MONEY & BANKING (ECON 345)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the banking system and the role of money in a market economy. The course deals with the nature of money, the commercial banking system, financial markets, the Federal Reserve System, monetary theory and policy, and the international monetary system. Prerequisite: ECON220.

PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING (FIN 360)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the personal financial planning process and the professional services environment that promotes and implements personal financial plans and products. Topics include personal financial data gathering, establishing personal goals and objectives, risk management and insurance products, investment strategies, income tax planning, retirement planning, and estate and gift planning. The preparation of formal personal financial plans is also included. Prerequisite: FIN300.

FINANCIAL INVESTMENT ANALYSIS (FIN 400)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the investment environment and process. The investment environment describes investment securities and their purchase and sale. The investment process describes the decision-making procedure of acquiring and disposing of securities in competitive financial markets. It examines the relationship of risk and expected reward in light of rigid investment goals. Prerequisites: FIN300 and QUAN340.

RETIREMENT, ESTATE, AND RISK MANAGEMENT PLANNING (FIN 420)

3 sem. hrs.

This course takes an in-depth look at strategies for retirement planning, asset transfer planning, and managing risk. Topics include pension plans, social security, investments for retirement needs, estate tax, gift tax, probate, trusts, gifts, life insurance, property insurance, health insurance, disability insurance, and non-insurance risk management strategies. Prerequisite: FIN360 or permission of the instructor.

PROFESSIONAL SELLING (MKTG 390) 3 sem. hrs.

This course provides students with the skills necessary to initiate, build and maintain the customer relationship through personal sales. It covers the prospect, sales presentations and proposals, handling objections, negotiations, closing the sale, and post-sale account management. Legal and ethical issues, and territory management techniques also are covered. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220, MKTG300.

INTERNSHIP IN FINANCIAL SERVICES (FIN 495) 3-15 sem. hrs.

The financial services internship provides students with an on-the-job learning experience in a commercial firm, government agency, or institution. Interns have an opportunity to apply classroom learning in a practical work environment. Financial Services interns must have earned 60 credits, with at least 15 of those credits taken at Edinboro University, and including a minimum of 9 credits in the Financial Services Requirements section (Section III) of the Business Administration - Financial Services Curriculum Requirements. A minimum 2.6 grade point average in his/her major and a 2.4 grade point average overall is required. Application approval will be in accordance with University policy.



INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COURSES

INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (BUAD 320)

3 sem. hrs.

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the principles of information resource management and related business information system applications and issues. A managerial approach familiarizes students with organizational applications in accounting, finance, operations, marketing and other specialized areas in business. Students will also use the personal productivity tools, Excel, Word, Power Point and Access, to solve business problems. Prerequisites: MGMT300, CSCI104.

THE ECONOMICS OF MARKETS AND ENTERPRISE FINANCE (BUAD 640)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents those elements of economic and financial theory and those characteristics of the economic environment, which are necessary to an understanding of enterprise decision making. The role of the external economic environment and that of the financial function within the enterprise are emphasized. Those topics, which are of particular relevance to information technology, are emphasized. Prerequisites: knowledge of principles of financial accounting and microeconomics.

ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING (BUAD 645)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents established management and marketing theory and practice utilized in successful enterprise decision making. Topics which are of particular relevance to the management of information technology are emphasized. Prerequisites: knowledge of principles of financial accounting and microeconomics.

E-COMMERCE (BUAD 675)

3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the current business and technical issues of electronic commerce. Focus is on the motivation for and structure of the electronic commerce environments. Critical success factors, both economic and technical, are explored as well as legal and ethical issues. Design and deployment challenges are investigated. Prerequisites: IT660, BUAD640, BUAD645.



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COURSES

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (ECON 310)

3 sem. hrs.

The objective of the course is to study the economic basis for trade among nations, commercial policy, and international finance. The role and mechanism of international trade, trade barriers (tariffs and other interferences), the effect on the economies, exchange rate, balance of payments disturbances, international capital flows and the institutions designed to facilitate international trade are examined. Prerequisite: ECON220.

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (FIN 310)

3 sem. hrs.

An intensive study of the balance of payments adjustment mechanism and the international monetary system. Examines the role of international reserves in the international payment system, adjustment under fixed and flexible exchange rates, and the use of exchange controls. Prerequisites: ECON225 and ECON220.

COMPARATIVE MANAGEMENT (MGMT 310)

3 sem. hrs.

This course makes students aware of the complexity of operating multi-national firms in various cultures and nations. It analyzes the management functions, processes, and structures and the factors related to the cultural, social, economic, political, and physical dimensions of environments. Prerequisite: MGMT300.

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (MKTG 310)

3 sem. hrs.

This course acquaints students with international marketing. Three levels of competency form the goals of this course: first, an understanding of the critical nature of the economic, cultural, and political/legal backgrounds associated with international marketing; second, analytical skills in international market opportunity analysis; and third, competence relating to developing international market entry and maintenance strategies. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220, MKTG300.

LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (BUAD 410)

3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the legal environment of international business in an increasingly interdependent world and studies the major forms of conducting global business. It also surveys those laws of the United States which affect the multinational company. Prerequisites: BUAD260 or BUAD365 or permission of the instructor.



MANAGEMENT COURSES

PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (MGMT 300)

3 sem. hrs.

This course teaches students the managerial functions that are fundamental to the successful operation of an organization. It discusses models and techniques used in directing an organization and improving its performance along with current challenges and future trends. Prerequisites: ACCT220 and ECON225.

COMPARATIVE MANAGEMENT (MGMT 310)

3 sem. hrs.

This course makes students aware of the complexity of operating multi-national firms in various cultures and nations. It analyzes the management functions, processes, and structures and the factors related to the cultural, social, economic, political, and physical dimensions of environments. Prerequisite: MGMT300.

SUPPLY MANAGEMENT (MGMT 320)

3 sem. hrs.

Supply management functions are an integral and essential part of every business. This course covers these functions as they impact managerial decisions and profitability. Supplier selection and evaluation as well as establishing and maintaining relationships with suppliers also are covered. Both the theory of supply management and its applications will be demonstrated through lectures, exercises and case study methodology. Prerequisite: MGMT300.

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (MGMT 330)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces collective bargaining in the private and public sectors. Topics include the evolution of collective bargaining, the legal basis of bargaining, gaining recognition, contract negotiation and contract administration. It is appropriate for upper level undergraduates and industrial relations professionals including unionists, managers, and neutrals. Students who have completed ECON331 may not register for this course. Prerequisites: ECON220 and MGMT300.

PRODUCTION OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (MGMT 350)

3 sem. hrs.

This course describes the fundamentals of production/operations management (POM). It will discuss the importance of each area and show how the various functions fit together to make up an effective, efficient production system. Prerequisite: MGMT300.

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (MGMT 355)

3 sem. hrs.

Human Resource Management is a staff function which is responsible for personnel planning, recruitment, selection, staffing, controlling and rewarding of employees. This course is concerned with the personnel function as it affects individuals and the organization. Both the theory of human resource management and its application in business will be shown through lectures, exercises and the case study method. Prerequisite: MGMT300.

INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (MGMT 370)

3 sem. hrs.

Viewing enterprises as systems, this course introduces future managers to the origins of systems thinking and major systems concepts and applications. Prerequisite: MGMT300.



MARKETING COURSES

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (MKTG 300)

3 sem. hrs.

This course teaches students the fundamental concepts and practices of marketing and the factors that influence marketing decision making. It discusses both consumer and business-to-business markets along with current marketing challenges and future trends. Students learn to select target markets and develop the marketing mix (product, price, promotion, and distribution). Prerequisites: ACCT220 and ECON220.

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (MKTG 310)

3 sem. hrs.

This course acquaints students with international marketing. Three levels of competency form the goals of this course: first, an understanding of the critical nature of the economic, cultural, and political/legal backgrounds associated with international marketing; second, analytical skills in international market opportunity analysis; and third, competence relating to developing international market entry and maintenance strategies. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220 and MKTG300.

ADVERTISING & PROMOTION (MKTG 320)

3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the elements of the advertising and promotion mix and stresses the dependency of advertising and promotion management on a thorough understanding of marketing strategy. The course prepares students to plan and manage advertising and promotion campaigns in consumer and industrial marketing, and highlights ethical issues that can arise in advertising and promotion decision-making. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220 and MKTG300.

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (MKTG 340)

3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on two main approaches to the study of consumer behavior: a "micro" orientation, which focuses on the individual psychological processes that consumers use to make acquisition, consumption, and disposition decisions, and a "macro" orientation, which focuses on group behaviors and the symbolic nature of consumer behavior. The relevance of consumer behavior is also explored as it pertains to many constituents, including marketers, public policymakers, ethicists and consumer advocacy groups, and consumers themselves. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220 and MKTG300.

ELECTRONIC MARKETING (MKTG 350)

3 sem. hrs.

This course teaches students the fundamental concepts and practices of electronic marketing, and explores appropriate marketing strategies and tactics for doing business in a computer-mediated environment. Students learn the potential as well as the limitations of the Internet as a commercial medium, as a channel of distribution and as a market. Both consumer (B2C) and business (B2B) electronic marketing are discussed. Current electronic marketing challenges and trends are considered. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220 and MKTG300, or permission of instructor.

CHANNELS OF DISTRIBUTION (MKTG 360)

3 sem. hrs.

This course teaches students how firms manage the flow of products from the point of production to the point of consumption. It emphasizes an understanding of the relations among channel members and the role of the channel in the marketing strategy for both consumer and industrial markets. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220 and MKTG300.

BUSINESS MARKETING (MKTG 370)

3 sem. hrs.

This course teaches students the distinct nature of the marketing task when the customer is an organization. It emphasizes characteristics and dynamics of commercial, government and institutional markets. Students explore marketing strategies and techniques for these markets and understand the challenges and opportunities facing industrial marketers. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220 and MKTG300.

NEW PRODUCT PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT (MKTG 380)

3 sem. hrs.

This course presents a framework for developing new products and techniques for planning, implementing and evaluating new product introductions. Topics include product concept generation and evaluation, analysis of market potential, marketing strategy development, product use and market testing procedure, commercialization, and post-launch performance evaluation. It presents goods and services for both consumer and industrial markets. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220 and MKTG300.

PROFESSIONAL SELLING (MKTG 390)

3 sem. hrs.

This course provides students with the skills necessary to initiate, build and maintain the customer relationship through personal sales. It covers the prospect, sales presentations and proposals, handling objections, negotiations, closing the sale, and post-sale account management. Legal and ethical issues, and territory management techniques also are covered. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220 and MKTG300.

MARKETING RESEARCH (MKTG 410)

3 sem. hrs.

This course has been designed to teach how to collect, process, analyze, interpret, and report marketing information to be used for making marketing management decisions. Prerequisites: ACCT220, ECON220, MKTG300 and QUAN340 or consent of instructor.

MARKETING ANALYSIS & PLANNING (MKTG 475)

3 sem. hrs.

This course provides students with the skills necessary to analyze market conditions and to formulate strategies and plans for addressing market opportunities. It covers analysis of the firm's marketing performance, market demand and competition, and market opportunities in domestic and international markets, as well as the development and implementation of the firm's marketing plan. Prerequisites: MGMT300, FIN300, QUAN340, and two MKTG courses numbered 310 or higher.

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MARKETING (MKTG 490)

Variable Credit

This course meets the needs of students who wish to earn academic credit by investigating topics or completing projects which are not normally included in specific marketing courses. Students work under the direction of a member of the marketing faculty. Application approval is required.

INTERNSHIP IN MARKETING (MKTG 495)

3-15 sem. hrs.

The marketing internship provides students with an on-the-job learning experience in the marketing function of a commercial firm, government agency, or institution. Interns have an opportunity to apply classroom learning in a practical work environment. Marketing interns must have earned 60 credits, with at least 15 of those credits taken at Edinboro University, and including a minimum of 9 credits in the Marketing Requirements section (Section III) of the Business Administration - Marketing Curriculum Requirements. A minimum 2.6 grade point average in his/her major and a 2.4 grade point average overall is required. Application approval will be in accordance with University policy.



QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS COURSES

QUANTITATIVE BUSINESS ANALYSIS (QUAN 200)

3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces basic quantitative techniques applicable to business operations and prepares students for subsequent business courses. Students should have completed at least one year of high school algebra.

STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS & ECONOMICS (QUAN 340)

3 sem. hrs.

The course reviews descriptive statistics, probability, and probability distributions. It includes sources of business and economic data, estimation and hypothesis testing, and applied regression analysis, stressing throughout the course computer applications using business and economic data. Prerequisite: MATH260.