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James Daniel Fisher

 

About J.D. Fisher 

JDF in Rome

Title: Professor of Politics & Legal Studies; Chair, Department of Political Science & Criminal Justice
Programs: Political Science, Legal Studies
Areas of Specialization:
Law and Politics, Reproductive Politics, American Politics, Political Theory
Education: Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison; J.D., William and Mary School of Law; B.A., Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

J.D. Fisher has been teaching at Edinboro University since the fall of 2000; he is also an alumnus of the school (class of 1993, with degrees in political science and English). He is a professor of politics and legal studies and chair of the Department of Political Science and Criminal Justice. He is currently serving a term as co-chair of the Edinboro President's Commission on LGBTQIA Affairs. From 2002-2014, he served as the University's pre-law advisor and served a previous term as department chair, from 2008 to 2012.

Professor Fisher teaches courses in law and politics, American politics, and political theory. He is particularly interested in reproductive politics, that is, the law and politics of abortion, contraception, sex education, and population control. Professor Fisher gives public lectures and participates in public forums discussing constitutional and legal issues including reproductive politics, First Amendment rights, and issues regarding sexual orientation and gender expression. He provides occasional political analysis to the Erie Times-News and local television news organizations. 

Professor Fisher trained as a community organizer with the Gamaliel Foundation and served as the vice president of a local political advocacy group; as an officer in the faculty labor union of the State System of Higher Education; and on the local and state Boards of Directors of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania. Professor Fisher is currently president of the board of trustees of a private K-8 school.

Professor Fisher has been nominated twice for Edinboro's Educator of the Year award. 

Office hours, fall 2014, 146 Hendricks Hall

Tuesday 2:00-3:00 pm

Wednesday & Thursday 1:00-3:00 pm

If my office hours conflict with your schedule, feel free to e-mail to make an appointment at a different day or time. 

Contact: jdfisher@edinboro.edu; 814-732-1233 (direct line); 814-732-2409 (Department office phone)

Links


Reproductive Politics Blog: I discuss issues related to contraception, abortion, and family planning (RESTARTING September 1, 2014)

Politics.Edinboro: A Facebook page where I discuss politics with students and colleagues.

Lectures on politics: Many of my lectures on American politics have been videotaped. You can watch them here. 

Courses, fall 2014

POLI 370, Political Thought I (Ancient and Medieval Political Thought)

Class time: W 6:00-8:30 pm
Class location: 201 Hendricks Hall
Syllabus: TBA

Course description: In this course students will explore the most important topics in politics-- justice, freedom, equality, obligation, and the role of the state in people’s lives—by discussing and evaluating the writings of major ancient and medieval political philosophers and thinkers. Students are asked to read carefully, write thoughtfully, and argue openly– in short, teach themselves about political thought in the liberal arts tradition.

POLI 375, Reproductive Politics (Fall 2014)

Class time: T 6:00-8:30 pm
Class location: 201 Hendricks Hall
Syllabus: Click TBA

Course description: This course explores the law and politics of human reproduction, including controversies over contraception, abortion, sex education, and population control.

Recently offered courses

POLI 100, Introduction to Politics (Fall 2013)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: This course introduces students to politics and its effect within and across societies. Topics include, among others, basic concepts in politics; the components, varieties, and dynamics of political systems; and major political ideas and values. Students also discuss approaches to analyzing politics.  This course is approved for General Education Core 2, World Civilizations. 

POLI 101, Introduction to American Politics (Spring 2014)

Syllabus: Click

Course description: This course is a comprehensive introduction to American politics and the American political system. This course is approved for General Education Core 3, American Civilizations.

POLI 463, Civil Liberties (Spring 2014)

Syllabus: Click

Course description: In this course, students analyze American constitutional law regarding individual and group freedoms. Topics include freedom of expression, free exercise of religion, separation of church and state, substantive due process, reproductive rights, sexual freedom, equal protection of the law, theories of constitutional interpretation, and the dynamics of Supreme Court decision-making.

POLI 370, Political Thought I (Ancient and Medieval Political Thought)(Fall 2013)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: In this course students will explore the most important topics in politics-- justice, freedom, equality, obligation, and the role of the state in people’s lives—by discussing and evaluating the writings of major ancient and medieval political philosophers and thinkers. Students are asked to read carefully, write thoughtfully, and argue openly– in short, teach themselves about political thought in the liberal arts tradition. 

POLI 372, Political Thought II (Modern Political Thought)(Spring 2014)

Syllabus: Click

Course description: In this course students will explore the most important topics in politics-- justice, freedom, equality, obligation, and the role of the state in people’s lives—by discussing and evaluating the writings of major modern political philosophers and thinkers. Students are asked to read carefully, write thoughtfully, and argue openly– in short, teach themselves about political thought in the liberal arts tradition.

FYE 103, Reproductive Politics (Fall 2013)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: In this course, students will explore the law and politics of human reproduction, including controversies over contraception, abortion, and sex education. Students will focus on American society but will enhance their comprehension through comparative analysis. Students will learn how to access and analyze a wide range of data (legal opinions, polls, scientific studies, etc.) and will be encouraged to take ownership of their own research and conclusions regarding reproductive politics. This course is approved for General Education Core 3, American Civilizations. 

POLI 343, Law and Legal Systems (Spring 2013)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: This course is a comprehensive introduction to law and legal systems, with a focus on the American legal system. Topics discussed include the concept of law; types of law; legal traditions; the legal process; legal analysis; judicial decision-making; and the structure and behavior of the major components of the legal systems including courts, lawyers, judges, and agents of legal mobilization.

CRIM 100, Introduction to Criminal Justice (Fall 2012)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: This course provides a broad overview of the theory, structure, development, and performance of the American system of criminal justice. Topics include, among others, the concept of crime; criminal behavior; American criminal law; constitutional limits on government power related to crime and justice; and the theory, structure, and practice of policing, adjudication, and corrections. 

POLI 463, Civil Liberties (Spring 2013)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: In this course, students analyze American constitutional law regarding individual and group freedoms. Topics include freedom of expression, free exercise of religion, separation of church and state, substantive due process, reproductive rights, sexual freedom, equal protection of the law, theories of constitutional interpretation, and the dynamics of Supreme Court decision-making. 

POLI 201, American Government (Spring 2013)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: This course is a comprehensive introduction to the major features, components, processes, and dynamics of American politics and the American political system. This course trains students to become more thoughtful consumers of current events, and therefore more active and thoughtful participants in American political life.  

POLI 201, American Government (Fall 2012)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: This course is a comprehensive introduction to the major features, components, processes, and dynamics of American politics and the American political system. This course trains students to become more thoughtful consumers of current events, and therefore more active and thoughtful participants in American political life. 

POLI 343, Law and Legal Systems (Fall 2011)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: This course is a comprehensive introduction to law and legal systems, with a focus on the American legal system. Topics discussed include the concept of law; types of law; legal traditions; the legal process; legal analysis; judicial decision-making; and the structure and behavior of the major components of the legal systems including courts, lawyers, judges, and agents of legal mobilization.

POLI 370, Political Thought I (Ancient and Medieval Political Thought)(Spring 2012)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description:  In this course students will explore the most important topics in politics-- justice, freedom, equality, obligation, and the role of the state in people’s lives—by discussing and evaluating the writings of major ancient and medieval political philosophers and thinkers. Students are asked to read carefully, write thoughtfully, and argue openly– in short, teach themselves about political thought in the liberal arts tradition. 

POLI 372, Political Thought II (Modern Political Thought)(Fall 2012)

Syllabus: Click here

Course description: In this course students will explore the most important topics in politics-- justice, freedom, equality, obligation, and the role of the state in people’s lives—by discussing and evaluating the writings of major modern political philosophers and thinkers. Students are asked to read carefully, write thoughtfully, and argue openly– in short, teach themselves about political thought in the liberal arts tradition.