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Course Offerings

 

  Course Offerings

 LINGUISTICS 
 COURSES

 LITERATURE
 COURSES

 THEATRE ARTS 
 COURSES

 WRITING
 COURSES
 

 ENGL 013  ENGL 115  THEA 200  ENGL 010
 ENGL 114  ENGL 116  THEA 201  ENGL 101
 ENGL 211  ENGL 117  THEA 202  ENGL 102
 ENGL 213  ENGL 118  THEA 203  ENGL 103
 ENGL 521  ENGL 119  THEA 211  ENGL 104
   ENGL 201  THEA 218  ENGL 301
   ENGL 202  THEA 250  ENGL 321
   ENGL 205  THEA 300  ENGL 322
   ENGL 209  THEA 309  ENGL 370
   ENGL 241  THEA 310  ENGL 385
   ENGL 242  THEA 311  ENGL 402
   ENGL 257  THEA 312  ENGL 403
   ENGL 260  THEA 313  ENGL 404
   ENGL 261  THEA 314  ENGL 410
   ENGL 288  THEA 315  ENGL 440
   ENGL 309  THEA 318  ENGL 441
   ENGL 310  THEA 319  ENGL 442
   ENGL 311  THEA 351  ENGL 443
   ENGL 314  THEA 397  ENGL 444
   ENGL 315  THEA 403  ENGL 498
   ENGL 316  THEA 405  ENGL 525
   ENGL 319  THEA 406  
   ENGL 325  THEA 409  
   ENGL 326  THEA 411  
   ENGL 330  THEA 412  
   ENGL 332, 333, 334  THEA 419  
   ENGL 335, 336, 337  THEA 490  
   ENGL 338, 339, 340  THEA 495  
   ENGL 341, 342, 343    
   ENGL 355    
   ENGL 365    
   ENGL 388    
   ENGL 389    
   ENGL 397, 398    
   ENGL 411, 412    
   ENGL 413, 414    
   ENGL 415, 416    
   ENGL 420    
   ENGL 450    
   ENGL 489    
   ENGL 490    
   ENGL 499    
   ENGL 545    

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LINGUISTICS COURSES


ENGL 013:  Advanced Intensive English [3 sem. hrs.]
An advanced course in English as a foreign language for international students who have successfully completed the requirements of ENGL 012 or who have obtained an 80 or more modified score on the Michigan English Language Proficiency Test or other equivalent instrument.  Students reaching this level of proficiency might be well served by also enrolling in ELED 102
This course is offered on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading basis only, and the credits do not count toward graduation.


ENGL 114:  Language in Human Life [3 sem. hrs.]
This course acquaints students with four areas in linguistics:  animal communication systems, language and the mind, language in the linguistic community, and computational linguistics.  Students learn about current theoretical issues, problems, and debates.  The course also addresses scientific application of research information in each area.    


ENGL 211:  Traditional Grammar [3 sem. hrs.]
This course provides students with an intensified study of English grammar based upon traditional principles and terminology to aid in the development of both knowledge and performance skills.
 
ENGL 213:  The Language of the Goddess [3 sem. hrs.]
This course acquaints students with the study of ancient and modern goddess cultures through approaches in anthropological linguistics.  The concept of "goddess," the centrality of the female, continues to be significant to many cultures and places where she has been venerated for ages.  In others, she is being revitalized and reconstructed.  The course content includes:  a survey of ancient and modern languages and cultures; an analysis of goddess texts, lore, archetypes and symbolism; and an assessment of cultural developments of the feminine principle across the world.
 
ENGL 521:  History of the English Language [3 sem. hrs.]
A study of the development of the English language from Anglo-Saxon times to the present with emphasis on the historical continuity of these changes.
 

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LITERATURE COURSES

Introductory Courses:  ENGL 115, ENGL 116, ENGL 117, ENGL 118, ENGL 119, ENGL 120, ENGL 253, ENGL 355, ENGL 257, ENGL 288
While intended for non-English majors seeking credit toward General Education Requirements, majors may take these courses for elective credit.  They will not count toward an English major in any program.  


ENGL 115:  Introduction to Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces three major literary genres (drama, poetry, and prose fiction) with particular emphasis on their fundamental formal elements and conventions.  Readings illustrate these elements and conventions, and enhance student appreciation and analysis of the artistic expressions.
This course is approved for General Education - Core 1. 
 
ENGL 116:  American Prose Classics [3 sem. hrs.]
Intended for non-majors, this course examines acknowledged masterpieces of American prose from the mid 19th century to the present.  Students read selected works involving major social themes and concerns, and study the context of the cultural forces that inspired them.
This course is approved for General Education - Core 3.
 

ENGL 117:  Introduction to Fiction [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces fiction by examining a selection of short stories, novellas, and novels.  An understanding of the elements of fiction - plot, setting, character, point of view, style/tone, theme, and symbols - as well as competence in written appreciation and analysis of the forms of fiction are additional goals of the course.
This course is approved for General Education - Core 1.  
 
ENGL 118:  Introduction to Poetry [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces students to the forms, themes, and the creative process of traditional and contemporary poetry, emphasizing written appreciation and formal analysis.
This course is approved for General Education - Core 1.
 
ENGL 119:  Introduction to Non-Fiction [3 sem. hrs.]
This course focuses on a critical reading and analysis of the major forms of non-fiction, including biography, autobiography, popular science, the essay, and new journalism, and introduces students to stylistic and rhetorical aspects of these forms.
This course is approved for General Education - Core 1. 
 
ENGL 201:  American Literature Survey I (Origins-1865) [3 sem. hrs.]
An examination of major trends in American literature from its beginnings through 1865, emphasizing representative figures and their relationship to major literary movements and cultural developments.
 
ENGL 202:  American Literature Survey II (1865-Present) [3 sem. hrs.]
An examination of major trends in American literature from 1865 to the present, emphasizing representative figures and their relationship to major literary movements and cultural developments. 
 
ENGL 205:  Multi-Ethnic American Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course in ethnic literature includes representative works and writers from Native American, Hispanic, Asian American, and African American communities, and traces their relationship to cultural concepts and literary movements.
This course is approved for General Education - Core 5.
 
ENGL 209:  Foundations for Literary Study [3 sem. hrs.]
This course has four goals:  to help students learn how to explicate texts and analyze various aspects of literary form; to help students understand English as a discipline; to help students acquire skills for writing about literature; and to help orient students to the English major at Edinboro University.  Central to the course is a survey of the practice of literary criticism.
This course is open to English and secondary education-English majors only. 
 
ENGL 241:  British Literature I (Anglo-Saxon through Neoclassical) [3 sem. hrs.]
This course studies early literary developments in England, from the early Middle Ages to the late 18th century, emphasizing major writers and their contributions to changing concepts of literary form and content.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1.
 
ENGL 242:  British Literature II (The Romantics through the Moderns) [3 sem. hrs.]
This course studies literary developments in England from the end of the 18th century to the present with emphasis on major writers and their contribution to changing concepts of literary form and content.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 257:  Science Fiction [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces students to the historical development of science fiction from the imaginative speculations of the classic Greeks to the most contemporary trends.
 
ENGL 260:  Literature of the Classic World [3 sem. hrs.]
This course studies literary classics of Greece and Rome in translation and acquaints students with the traditions of our classical heritage.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 261:  Literature of the Renaissance [3 sem. hrs.]
A study of 16th- and 17th-century literature, including English and continental works of fiction, poetry, drama, and the essay.
 
ENGL 288:  Literature of Mystery and Detection [3 sem. hrs.]
This course acquaints students with mystery and detective fiction from its beginning to the present, through an examination via literature and film of early and modern classics of the genre. 
 
ENGL 309:  African American Literature I:  Up to 1929 [3 sem. hrs.]
This course studies African American literature from its beginnings to one of its greatest moments during the Harlem Renaissance.  It emphasizes representative works and writers such as Phyllis Wheatley, Frederick Douglas, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston, and traces their relationships to major literary movements and cultural developments.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1.
 
ENGL 310:  African American Literature II:  After 1930 [3 sem. hrs.]
This course studies African American literature from 1930 to the present, and emphasizes representative works and writers such as Wright, Ellison, Morrison, and Reed.  It traces their relationships to major literary movements and cultural developments.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 311:  Literature by Women [3 sem. hrs.]
This course on literature by women includes representative works and writers and addresses recent changes in the canon.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 314:  Latin American Political Fiction [3 sem. hrs.]
This course looks at fictional representations of power, politics, and government in Latin America in order to better understand that world area's literary and political cultures
Prerequisite:  ENGL 102.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 315:  Shakespeare I [3 sem. hrs.]
An examination of selected comedies, histories, and tragedies from 1592-1602.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1.
 
ENGL 316:  Short Story [3 sem. hrs.]
This course examines the short story as a literary form.  By studying short stories written by national and international artists and representing a culturally diverse range of subjects, types, methods, and styles, students increase their understanding and appreciation of the short story as a unique form of literary art.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 319:  Shakespeare II [3 sem. hrs.]
This course examines the plays after 1602, emphasizing historical, social, literary, textual, dramatic, and stylistic considerations.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 325:  Literature of the Bible I [3 sem. hrs.]
This course offers a literary study of various genres from the Old Testament:  myth, poetry, history, short stories, wisdom literature, and prophecy.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 326:  Literature of the Bible II [3 sem. hrs.]
This course offers a literary study of selected texts from the Apocrypha, the New Testament, and extra canonical Christian literature contemporary with the New Testament.  This course is independent of ENGL 325 and may be taken alone.
This course is approved for General Education - DistrIbution 1.
 
ENGL 330:  Literature and Film [3 sem. hrs.]
This course examines the variety of relationships that exists between literary genres and film adaptations, focusing on fundamental similarities and differences among the genres, the adjustments necessary to transform literary works for the screen, and the major factors that determine the particular character of a film adaptation.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1.
 
ENGL 332, 333, 334:  Topics in Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course will examine a framed consideration of literature written by authors during the Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance periods.  The framing devise might be geographical, historical, thematic, cultural, or discipline specific.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 260 or ENGL 261.  This course is open to English and secondary education-English majors only or by permission of the instructor.
 
ENGL 335, 336, 337:  Topics in British Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course will examine a framed consideration of literature written by British authors.  The framing device might be geographical, historical, thematic, cultural, or discipline specific.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 241 or ENGL 242.  This course is open to English and secondary education-English majors only or by permission of the instructor
 
ENGL 338, 339, 340:  Topics in American Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course will examine a framed consideration of literature written by American authors.  The framing device might be geographical, historical, thematic, cultural, or discipline specific.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 201 or ENGL 202.  This course is open to English and secondary education-English majors only or by permission of the instructor. 
 
ENGL 341, 342, 343:  Topics in World Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course will examine a framed consideration of literature written by authors who are of neither British nor U.S. origin.  The framing device might be geographical, historical, thematic, cultural, or discipline specific.
 
ENGL 355:  Popular Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
Each time it is offered, this course will explore a particular genre of popular literature, such as science fiction, fantasy, detective literature, the romance novel, or horror.  The course will emphasize the form and history of the selected genre, and will exercise a variety of critical approaches. 
 
ENGL 365:  Women in Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course examines genre, period, literary movement, and/or theme, comparing female and male writers' portrayals of women characters and depictions of women's issues.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 388:  Mythology [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces students to basic mythic patterns and their relationships to social patterns.  Students study the need for myth making, the development of basic mythic patterns, and how specific myths have survived and evolved in modern literature.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 389:  World Mythologies [3 sem. hrs.]
This course surveys world mythologies, the major critical approaches to myth, and the role of myth in contemporary society.  It emphasizes myth as an expression of cultural values and world views and promotes an understanding of mythic themes and symbols in art and literature.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
ENGL 397, 398:  Studies in Language and Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
Individual courses designed primarily for the non-English major to focus on popular topics of language or literature. 
 
ENGL 411, 412:  Authors in Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course presents no more than three authors from the canon of Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance literature.  Content varies according to the interests and needs of the participants.
This course is restricted to English and secondary education-English majors or by permission of the instructor
 
ENGL 413, 414:  Authors in British Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course presents no more than three authors from the canon of British literature.  Content varies according to the interests and needs of the participants.
This course is restricted to English and secondary education-English majors or by permission of the instructor
 
ENGL 415, 416:  Authors in American Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course presents no more than three authors from the canon of American literature.  Content varies according to the interests and needs of the participants.
This course is restricted to English and secondary education-English majors or by permission of the instructor.
 
ENGL 420:  Feminist Literary Criticism [3 sem. hrs.]
This course in feminist literary criticism includes representative works and writers from all approaches to this field, and traces their relationship to cultural concepts and literary movements. 
 
ENGL 450:  Internships in Communication Arts [1-12 sem. hrs.]
Students gain professional experience in business, government, or industry under the supervision of the department.  Permission of the chairperson is required.
 
ENGL 489:  Literary Criticism:  Theory [3 sem. hrs.]
This course is a study of the origins and development of the theory of literary criticism using major writings. 
  
ENGL 490:  Independent Study [3-6 sem. hrs.]
The independent study program aims to serve those students whose scholarly interest seems clearly adapted to independent work.  Students may earn credit for work performed outside the classroom requirements of any specific course in the curriculum.  Permission of the chairperson is required. 
 
ENGL 499:  Thesis Seminar in Literature [3 sem. hrs.]
This course is designed to assist the student in understanding the role of literary research.  The content of the course will rotate according to the expertise of the instructor.  It will serve as a capstone course for English majors to demonstrate the variety of knowledge that they have collected and create a professional length study on the topic on the seminar.
This course is restricted to English and secondary education-English majors or by permission of the instructor
 
ENGL 545:  Adolescent Literature:  The Problem Novel [3 sem. hrs.]
This course examines the historical development of adolescent literature, literature appropriate for use in grades 5-12.
 

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THEATRE ARTS COURSES


THEA 200:  Applied Dance for Music Theatre [1 sem. hr.]
This one-credit course, which will meet one hour per week, will give students studio experience in dance technique, improvisation, composition, and performance.  Assessment will be based on proficiency, knowledge, and participation.  This course may be taken up to three times for credit.    
 

THEA 201:  Voice and Movement [3 sem. hrs.]   
 
THEA 202:  Play Analysis [3 sem. hrs.]    
 
THEA 203:  Fundamentals of Acting [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces theory and practice in the techniques of acting.  It emphasizes styles of acting, dramatic forms, voice and speech, stage movement, improvisation and characterization.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
THEA 211:  Practicum [1-3 sem. hrs.]    
 

THEA 218:  Introduction to Theatre [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces students to the theatre and develops their appreciation of drama as an art form through its emphasis on the structure, techniques, and forms of dramatic composition from classic Greek times to the present.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1.  


THEA 250:  History of Dance in American Musical Theatre [2 sem. hrs.]
This course will introduce students to elements and styles of dance, with an emphasis on how they have been adapted to Broadway and Hollywood musical theatre.  The course will also address the history of dance in theatre and film, beginning choreography, and notable dancers and choreographers.  Students will receive practical instruction in how to prepare for auditions. 
 
THEA 300:  Theatre and Stage Management [3 sem. hrs.] 
 

THEA 309:  Children's Theatre [3 sem. hrs.]
For those persons whose responsibility will be to work directly with children or with adults in the production of plays for children, this course attempts to solve the problems inherent in youth-centered productions.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
THEA 310:  Creative Dramatics I [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces acting, playmaking, and theatre appreciation through improvisation.  It fosters imagination, sensory awareness, pantomime, concentration, creative movement, and creativity.  It is designed as a prologue to teaching creative drama at the elementary and secondary level.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
THEA 311:  Stagecraft I [3 sem. hrs.]
This course acquaints the student with the rudiments of building, painting, and moving scenery under varied conditions.  It includes the operation and maintenance of stage machinery and stage management.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
THEA 312:  Stagecraft II [3 sem. hrs.]
A continuation of THEA 311.
Prerequisite:  THEA 311 or permission of the instructor
 
THEA 313:  Costume and Makeup [3 sem. hrs.]
This course studies making of costumes, including materials, substitutions, patterns and pattern-drafting, dyeing, aging, and maintenance of wardrobe.  It includes the design and application of makeup for theatre and television. 
 
THEA 314:  Stage Lighting [3 sem. hrs.]
This course acquaints students with the requirements for theatre lighting specialists.  Basic electricity, as well as lighting for film and television, will be included. 
 
THEA 315:  Scene Design [3 sem. hrs.]
This course acquaints students with the requirements and the basic skills necessary for scenic designers today with attention to the place of design in theatre historically.  
 
THEA 318:  History of the Theatre to 1642 [3 sem. hrs.]
This course examines the development of the theatre and theatre art from the earliest times to the closing of the theatres in England in 1642.  It studies conditions, the lives of performers, theatre architecture and the development of theatrical convention and dramaturgy.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
THEA 319:  History of Theatre from 1660 to Present [3 sem. hrs.]
This course examines the continuing development of theatre art from the Restoration to the present.  Equal attention is given to dramaturgy, production conditions, theatre architecture, and the means of the actor.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1. 
 
THEA 351:  Playwriting [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces the student to the theory and practice of dramatic writing, the reading of selected plays and texts, and the writing of various types of dramatic scenes and a one-act play.  
 
THEA 397:  Studies in Drama [3 sem. hrs.]
Special topics in the study of theatrical techniques and dramatic literature. 
 
THEA 403:  Advanced Acting [3 sem. hrs.]
A course designed to continue in depth the training of the student actor.  The course focuses on the actor's total means of expression, dealing with both the inner and external technique.
Prerequisite:  THEA 203 or consent of the instructor
 
THEA 405:  Directing I [3 sem. hrs.]
This course explores the elements of play directing, including choice of plays, methods of directing, use of stage, and creation of atmosphere.
Prerequisite:  THEA 203 and THEA 311 or consent of the instructor.  
 
THEA 406:  Directing II [3 sem. hrs.]
A continuation of THEA 405.  This course covers the problems of directing plays from selected periods of theatrical history.  Students will be responsible for the presentation of scenes from plays of different periods.
Prerequisite:  THEA 405
 
THEA 409:  High School Play Production [3 sem. hrs.]
For persons who may direct high school plays, this course includes play selections, financing, production techniques, and other problems associated with that age group. 
 
THEA 411:  Drama Workshop I [3 sem. hrs.]
Participation in dramatic production as actor, stage hand, technician, etc. is required.  Persons receiving credit for this course will gain experience in all facets of play production. 
 
THEA 412:  Drama Workshop II [3 sem. hrs.]
A continuation of THEA 411
 
THEA 419:  Dramatic Theory and Criticism [3 sem. hrs.]
A study of dramatic theories and dramatic criticism from Aristotle to the present with emphasis on the understanding and use of dramatic theory through study and written critiques. 
 
THEA 490:  Independent Study in Drama [2-5 sem. hrs.]  
 

THEA 495:  Theatre Internship [3-15 sem. hrs.]   
   

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WRITING COURSES 


ENGL 010:  Basic Writing Skills [3 sem. hrs.]
This competency-based course emphasizes the application of grammatical principles needed by those students identified as lacking the skills essential for ENGL 101.  Other students may wish to select this course because they lack confidence in their ability to make use of the writing skills required for effective college writing assignments. 
This course is offered on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading basis only, and the credits do not count toward graduation.


ENGL 101:  College Writing Skills [3 sem. hrs.]
This competency-based course is a study of the organization and development of ideas in written composition, beginning with the paragraph and proceeding to the full-length paper.  In this course, students develop the writing skills needed to prepare expository writing assignments, including college-level themes and essay examinations.  Concurrently, students develop the reading competencies needed for a functional understanding of the texts and other resource materials used in this course.
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of ENGL 010 or English Department placement.
This course is approved for General Education - Skills.
 
ENGL 102:  Specialized College Writing and Research Skills [3 sem. hrs.]
This competency-based course is a practical study of the methodology of research with emphasis on library usage, research techniques, organizational principles, documentation, and manuscript form.  In this course, students develop the writing skills needed to prepare various specialized writing assignments including the fully documented library research paper, which is the major writing form of the course.
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of ENGL 101 or equivalent competency.
This course is approved for General Education - Skills.
 
ENGL 103:  College Writing Skills - Advanced [3 sem. hrs.]
This advanced competency-based course will require the student to develop the writing skills necessary to prepare superior college writing assignments.  Student writing will focus on the development and organization of ideas in paragraphs and full-length critical and analytical papers.  This course will require the student to achieve the level of skills necessary to progress to the more advanced techniques of writing research papers in ENGL 104.
Prerequisite:  University Testing Placement.
This course is approved for General Education - Skills.
 
ENGL 104:  Specialized College Writing and Research Skills - Advanced [3 sem. hrs.]
This advanced competency-based course is an intensive study and implementation of the techniques of critical research with emphasis on analysis, the principles of organization and synthesis, documentation, and manuscript form.  The students will be required to compose longer papers with the fully documented research paper being the major writing form of the course.  Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be capable of demonstrating superior college writing and research abilities in all curricula.
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of ENGL 103.
This course is approved for General Education - Skills.
 
ENGL 301:  Creative Writing [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces students to the forms and techniques of creative writing and gives them experience at writing both fiction and poetry.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 101.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1.
 
ENGL 321:  Legal Writing [3 sem. hrs.]
A study of argumentative and expository report writing, designed primarily for undergraduate criminal justice and pre-law students, with emphasis on clarity of organization about quasi-legal problems with attention given to style, diction, and grammar.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 101.
 
ENGL 322:  Screen Writing [3 sem. hrs.]
This course covers dramatic theory, sample scripts, and sample films and videos.  Students write short dramatic screenplays correctly formatted for the medium of their choice.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 101 and ENGL 301.
 
ENGL 370:  Business English [3 sem. hrs.]
This course is an introduction to writing business letters and reports.  It will provide extensive practice in writing, reviewing, and revising.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.
 
ENGL 385:  Advanced Composition [3 sem. hrs.]
This course focuses on advanced expository writing.  It studies rhetorical techniques and their practical application; issues of audience, style, and organization; and the composing/revising process.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 101.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1.
 
ENGL 402:  Fiction Workshop [3 sem. hrs.]
Building on a foundation laid in ENGL 301, students in this course compose full-length short stories; analyze the work of contemporary and canonical practitioners of the form; and critique the work-in-progress of their colleagues.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 301.
 
ENGL 403:  Poetry Workshop [3 sem. hrs.]
Building on a foundation laid in ENGL 301, students enrolled in this course compile a portfolio of original poetry; analyze the work of contemporary and canonical practitioners of the form; reacquaint themselves with the power of oral recitation; undertake a practical study of poetic form and rhetoric; and critique the work-in-progress of their colleagues.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 301.
 
ENGL 404:  Technical Writing [3 sem. hrs.]
A study of exposition adapted to the needs of students in sciences and engineering, using analytic written presentations, correspondence, technical reports, and scientific papers.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 102.
This course is approved for General Education - Distribution 1.
 
ENGL 410:  Advanced Technical Writing [3 sem. hrs.]
This course provides intensive instruction in designing, writing, and editing extended technical documents.
Prerequisites:  ENG 404 or permission of the instructor.
This course is approved for General Education - Computer Competency.
 
ENGL 440:  Essay Workshop [3 sem. hrs.]
Personal essays - short nonfiction pieces based on the writer's own experiences - are part of a rich literary tradition.  In this course, students compose original essays that receive commentary from the instructor and their peers.  To situate students' writing within a literary context, the course includes a brief survey of the history of the personal essay, focusing on selected authors from the 16th century to the present.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 385.
 
ENGL 441:  Advanced Fiction Writing [3 sem. hrs.]
Building on a foundation laid earlier in the writing concentration, students in this course develop their ability to prepare full-length novella manuscripts or extensive portions of a fully realized novel.  Students will also refine their critical thinking, speaking, and writing skills as they respond to one another's writings, the lengthy fiction written by masters of the art, and current literary works.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 402.
 
ENGL 442:  Advanced Poetry Writing [3 sem. hrs.]
Building on a foundation laid earlier in the writing concentration, students in this course develop their ability to match poetic form to subject matter; deepen their understanding of how poetic tradition influences poetic practice; and refine their critical thinking, speaking, and writing skills as they respond to one another's poems, poems written by masters of the art, and poems published in current literary periodicals.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 403.
 

ENGL 443:  Advanced Creative Nonfiction [3 sem. hrs.]
This course combines the information-gathering techniques of the nonfiction writer - observation, research, and recollection - with the stylistic and rhetorical techniques of the novelist or short-story writer - setting, conflict, character development, narrative voice, dialogue, and metaphor.  This course will acquaint students with the work of contemporary creative nonfiction writers, and will require students to draft, revise, and edit several extended-length nonfiction prose pieces, with the ultimate objective of publication.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 440.
 
ENGL 444:  Advanced Screenwriting [3 sem. hrs.]
Building on a foundation laid earlier in the writing concentration, students in this course develop their ability to complete a feature-length screenplay using the accepted professional format and standards.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 322.
 
ENGL 498:  Thesis Seminar in Writing [3 sem. hrs.]
This course provides English/writing majors the opportunity to demonstrate professional expertise by planning a semester-long project in a particular writing genre; making a formal proposal to the seminar as a whole; participating in regularly scheduled oral and written critiques of work-in-progress; producing a ready-for-publication version of the project; and presenting the completed project in a public forum.
Course is open to English majors - writing concentration only.
 
ENGL 525:  Composition Theory [3 sem. hrs.]
This course introduces students to the theories and research informing the writing process and the teaching of that process.  It also examines the relationship of grammar instruction to the writing process.
Prerequisite:  ENGL 101/103 and ENGL 102/104 or equivalent.


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Chairperson:

Thomas Lipinski
Centennial Hall 230
295 Meadville Street
Edinboro, PA  16444
Phone:  814-732-1555
Email:  tlipinski@edinboro.edu

 

Department Office:

Ms. Reneé Pistory
Centennial Hall 322
295 Meadville Street
Edinboro, PA  16444
Phone:  814-732-2736
Fax:  814-732-2189